My Five Streams of Income

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According to this, “65% of self-made millionaires had three streams of income” and “29% of self-made millionaires had five or more”. Meanwhile, this article starts breaking down “7 different income streams”, but some of their recommendations are things most of us should be doing anyway, like investing. Other ones are downright odd. Do you consider your spouse’s salary as a stream of your income? I don’t. I don’t think you should either.

For this article, I’m laying out the five streams of income I actually count. If you count my index funds or the fact I’m technically a SOCAN-recognized composer who’s only earned pennies in royalties, I have more. I’m mainly counting my side hustles that actually put money in the bank though. This is how I make my money.

My main gig is I’m a wedding photographer. My smallest package is $990 (two hours) and my largest package is $4,995 (twelve hours). My secondary gig is as a liquor store clerk, making a paltry $13.50/hour. I could choose a more lucrative job, but this is pure fun for me. I could spend all day talking about wine, and I’d actually be less happy making $20/hour doing something I didn’t care about. My third gig is as a landlord. In March, I’ll be looking after two renters/roommates, and you should know this is actually more work than I thought. For now, any rent money I make is going back into renovating the property. Both bathrooms need to be redone, but this is an investment for the future. A beautiful bathroom will enable me to charge more for rent once my friends move on. My fourth gig is I write for pay now, and make $0.15/word on assignments. This is currently super fun for me! I can do this anywhere I want, and if I had an idle gig where I’m just needed as a warm body — think security guard or exam invigilator — I could be earning twice the pay for the same hours! In just one week of November, I was able to bill a startup $225 for three short blog posts. I’m looking at developing this as one of my main sources of income in the next few months. My last gig is a questionable one, but it technically counts as investing. This one deserves its own paragraph.

Early in November, I started dabbling with cryptocurrency. I now own small slices of Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, and IOTA. In just six weeks of casual trading, I’ve put in $800 and I’m somehow $500 ahead. Before you drop everything and throw your life savings into Bitcoin though, you need to understand the technology and the risks. This is why I consider my cryptocurrency investing a “gig”. I read this and this in the past month, and I stay up-to-date on trends. It’s a job. I don’t advise you getting into cryptocurrency blindly. Everyone thinks they can time the market, and people have lost their life savings believing that. I’m fully aware I could lose my entire investment at any time. If you try this, proceed with extreme caution. I know friends of friends who have lost $10,000. Know the risks. This, as a hobby, is my fifth and final gig.

You’ve heard of “fuck you money” (FU$), but I love the idea of my multiple “fuck you jobs”. Liquor store lays me off? That’s fine. I can replace a whole month of clerk income with a single wedding shoot. Roommates moving out? A little extra writing, and I’ll still make my strata payments on time. When new roommates move in, rent will actually go up because of the shiny bathrooms! If I lose my entire crypto investment? My index funds are still making profit, and I’m sure I can come up with something to make up the loss, like renting out my camera gear. I truly believe YOU CAN ALWAYS MAKE A BUCK. With full-time employment becoming less and less stable, diversifying your streams of income is just as important as diversifying your investments. It’s just the smart thing to do!

Remember: “65% of self-made millionaires had three streams of income”.

How’d you like to be part of that statistic?

This is Why Every Job Has a Shitty Part

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My job’s pretty great. It wasn’t long ago I was shooting with swimsuit models and crisscrossing the globe on multi-thousand dollar contracts. That lifestyle doesn’t work so great for me anymore (and this is why), but I had a good thing going. It was easy for others to be envious. They didn’t see all the hard work below the surface.

Yes, I’d shoot world-class conferences and their eventual afterparties, but they never saw me cabbing to a backup site in a faraway hotel at 2 in the morning when I needed to be up again to shoot at 6. Yes, I photographed models, but people never saw me working with an awkward 14-year-old model who seemed like she was forced into it by her mother. Yes, I shot extravagant weddings that I adored, but no one saw me editing for 15-hour days for full weeks at a time. I went kinda batshit. I once went so insane I’d edit for 15 minutes, THEN JOG AROUND THE FUCKING BLOCK before I could edit another 15 minutes! I was twitching like a meth addict. It was fucking hell. And you know what?

It was still a great job.

Like mopping at my liquor store, I found it far too easy to complain about shitty tasks. It wasn’t until speaking to people like my programmer roommate or film industry friends that I realized I was being a baby about it.

“Oh, you spend 15 hours a day editing in a warm room where you can sneak a beer anytime you want? Life must be SO HARD.”

“You don’t have a boss and get final say on your images? Try having to communicate with six other people working on the same project, and making that project WORK. Fuck off.”

I’m paraphrasing, but the sentiment is genuine. The shitty parts of my job were negligible to other people. To them, I was already living the dream, and here’s why: I GOT SO USED TO ALL THE DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF MY JOB, I SIMPLY CHOSE THE LEAST ENJOYABLE PARTS OF IT TO COMPLAIN ABOUT. I had a great job all along!

No one’s denying there are parts of your job that suck. It just helps to have perspective from people who have it worse off than you. I hated mopping. Tell that to a janitor. He hates cleaning urinals. Tell that to a sanitation engineer at a wastewater treatment plant. She hates unclogging pipes in literal human waste. Tell that to a “manual scavenger” in India with no protective gear. YOUR JOB DOESN’T SUCK. YOU’RE JUST SO USED TO HOW CUSHY IT IS, IT’S MADE YOU A WUSS.

Surely, maintaining your composure as a customer asks for EVEN MORE extra olives on their sandwich isn’t cause for hara-kiri, and overtime on Christmas might actually be okay once you account for stat pay. If you’re in North America and working for above minimum wage, you actually have it pretty good. What’s shitty to you is a dream to someone else! Even my friends who work in the Downtown Eastside do so as a passion project, and THEY HAVE THE CHOICE TO LEAVE.

Stop complaining. Love your job. Difficulty doesn’t suck, it helps you grow.

THE ONLY REASON YOU COMPLAIN ABOUT YOUR JOB AT ALL IS BECAUSE YOU HAVE IT SO GOOD, YOU FEEL THE NEED TO FIND SOMETHING NEGATIVE ABOUT IT.

Prove me wrong. Go ahead and tell us why your job sucks in the comments.