Losing Weight Is Saving Me Money

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A year ago, I went toe-to-toe with our artist friend “A” on food spending. I did not do well. Where I spent “$1,340.83 [in] November on comestibles – $902.33 on food, $438.50 on alcohol”, “A” spent “only $360/month”. I’m still not nearly as badass as her. I’m still not vegan, and I still spend most of my money on what I eat and drink. Here’s a quick breakdown of October 2017.

I ate out a stupid amount. After wrapping up my cooking-at-home experiment, I thought I should treat myself. Obviously, this was a bad move. I even paid for some friends’ meals, and ended up with a food total of $760.17. I was fucking stupid. It wasn’t even luxury food! I toned down on booze though — thanks to this, this, and this — and ended up with an alcohol total of only $311.90. (To see how far I’ve come, check out January 2016’s total of “$1,120.27”!) Total food and drink cost for October 2017? $1,072.07. This, I consider my most recent baseline. I was eating and drinking as much as I wanted, and no diet or even a modicum of restraint was applied here.

In November, I knew I wanted to make a change. I wanted to be the best 30-year-old I could be, and that meant getting down to 163 pounds. Intermittent fasting and other dietary measures made a reappearance, so my sushi lunches and Subway sandwiches got swapped out for frozen chicken, conveniently-packaged-yet-still-affordable spinach and kale, and boatloads of beans. Alcohol crept up (and so did the discovery of an amazingly expensive izakaya) but I managed to only blow $531.84 on food, or $17.73/day. Alcohol came in at $401.50, or $13.38/day. Total for both: $933.34.

These numbers weren’t the extreme improvement I was expecting, but saving $138.73/month with better health is still a victory! I successfully hit my weight goal, and virtually every meal I eat now involves half a plate of greens. Also, we’re currently 11 days into December, and I’m watching my food expenses like a hawk. Though I expect our Christmas dinner to break the bank, I’m only at $85.78, or $7.79/day for food. That’s the way it should be. Only improvements from here on out!

As a final note, I realized beef was killing my budget. A particularly ambitious brisket set me back $50.06 at one point, and though it was good for multiple meals, it’s hard to justify when 3kg of frozen chicken also good for multiple meals was only $10. Also weird: I don’t miss beef! Maybe I’m doing it wrong, but a steak hasn’t wowed me in years. Smoked beef ribs will always hold a special place in my heart, but I don’t intend to buy a $3,999 smoker ever. It’s also worth noting “beef requires 28 times more land, six times more fertilizer and 11 times more water” than pork, chicken, dairy or eggs, and that drain on resources is reflected in the price. Even if environmental reasons don’t convince you, the price should. 1kg of prime rib is $30.66. 1kg of chicken is $7.41.

In short, being mindful about what I eat actually saves me money! My health, the environment, and my wallet all benefit. At this point, it’s only logical to eat less, eat more greens, eat less beef, and bank the savings. My $138.73/month in savings is $1,664.76/year. If I keep this up until I’m 65, that’s almost $60,000! An extra sixty-grand to live longer and make the world a better place? That’s a sacrifice I’m willing to make.

Got beef? Let’s take it to Facebook.

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I’ve Got Saving Money Down To A Tea

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Over the past few months, I’ve been making seriously big changes to my diet; not for health, but for my pocketbook. I accidentally got healthy in the process, but this isn’t about that. This is about my ongoing quest to reduce my annual food and drink costs by thousands.

Last October, I spent $1,314.54 on food and alcohol. Obviously, that’s ridic, so I tried to tone it down. By April 2017, I’d brought that down to $1,048.57 – $518.02 on food, $530.55 on alcohol. The fact I still spent more on alcohol than food was fucking bonkers though. I knew I could do better. I had to. Fast forward to now, and I’m tackling the booze budget. I think I can still have the good life AND spend only $300/month on drinks. Reluctantly, I started with evaluating why the fuck I drank so much in the first place. It wasn’t pretty.

I think I just like blowing money. On the cheap end, I guzzle bad beer without even thinking about it. On the high end, I internally justify things like my latest Mâcon-Lugny purchase by saying I like the artistry of good wine. Both situations brought me to the same conclusion: I like to feel rich, even when I’m not. This was a problem.

So what felt luxurious, but was still cheap? Soda? Juice? Coffee? Water? I booted soda and juice right away because I know the problems excess sugar can cause. Coffee was out because I don’t even like the taste. It’s utilitarian to me, and the sweet ones had the same sugar problem. Water was, well… water. It was useful, but I didn’t see the appeal. And that’s when my friend “A” popped in with a line that would save me tens of thousands in a lifetime: “Ooo! In summer we make cold brew tea, it’s really good! You just put a tea bag in a jug of water in the fridge and let it sit for a few hours (or overnight). Cold refreshing tea and it’s only a few cents per glass”.

Sold.

Just a few hours later, I’d hunted down my nearest Bulk Barn and found Earl Grey teabags for cheap. 40 teabags for <$3. I assumed at the time that’d account for 40 large jugs. Upon experimentation though, each 2L jug requires two teabags, meaning each teabag produces 1L. The math couldn’t be neater.

Basically, every time I drink a pint of tea (<4¢) instead of a pint of beer ($2+), I’m saving at least $1.96! Could the savings really be that simple? Could I really be adding $1.96 to my bottom line every time I drank tea? Maybe not exactly, but it was a step in the right direction! Believing in that $1.96 would motivate me to choose tea more often, and I’d see savings instantly!

Well, it’s now September 28, and I’ve had this experiment going for four solid weeks. Alcohol expenses so far? ONLY $408.94! That’s a noticeable improvement! Tea is helping me save ~$100/month! That’s ~$1,200/year! That’s ~$12,000 over 10 years! AHHHHH! WHY WASN’T I DOING THIS BEFORE?!?

A final note: tea’s goddamn delightful. I bought a small water bottle and carry teabags out with me now. Almost any establishment is willing to refill your water or give you ice, so it’s like free tea wherever you go. Hot or cold, it’s a great choice. Embrace tea and cut out more expensive drinks.

Anything more than 5¢/glass is too steep.