Investing With As Little As $1/Day

Screen Shot 2017-10-30 at 4.17.15 PM

Let’s do this in two minutes.

Here’s some quick math to help you with your investing goals. No bullshit, no preamble. Share this with your friends to show them how easy retirement and investing can be. At 29, I’m better prepared than some 50-year-olds I know. Here’s how.

The math here assumes you’re 30 and will invest small amounts steadily until 65. That’s 35 years of growth. I invest aggressively in index funds, and I’ve been averaging around 7% annually. Let’s see what investing tiny amounts every day can do from 30-65 at 7% growth.

*****

• $1/day (or $365/year) = $53,988 at 65
• $2/day (or $730/year) = $107,976 at 65
• $5/day (or $1,825/year) = $269,942 at 65
• $10/day (or $3,650/year) = $539,884 at 65
• $20/day (or $7,300/year) = $1,079,768 at 65

*****

That’s bonkers, right? Every $1/day you put away can add $50,000+ to your retirement account? Time to bust out the ol’ piggy bank!

As for what to invest in, I can only tell you what my money’s in: the RBC U.S. Index Fund. (I also recommend TD U.S. Index Fund – e, which offers similar results, but with a lower MER.)

Depending on your goals, you might want to invest differently, so investigate options yourself and see if you can find better. All I know is I don’t worry about retirement anymore. With ~$20,000 in that index fund already and $10/day contributions, I’m anticipating ~$740,000 at 65.

Ready to do this? Calculate your numbers here, and comment with your findings below!

Not bad for a 2-minute read, huh?

Advertisements

So You Want to Be a Millionaire…

18217521_10158719792165691_26357038_n

No 18-year-old has $41,600, but that’s pretty much the only thing standing between a high school grad and them becoming a millionaire in their lifetime. Yep, through the magic of compound interest, that’s all it takes to get to seven digits. Here’s how much money you’ll need to become a millionaire by retirement depending on your age. This data assumes you’ll retire at 65 and have your money invested in something that generates 7% interest. (You can find my justification for that number here and here.) It also assumes that: 1) You make no further contributions toward your nest egg, and 2) you make no withdrawals until you’re 65. This is presented as data ONLY. I hope you find it as interesting as I did.

*****

All of these equal $1M:
18 – $41,600 x 47 years of 7% growth
19 – $44,500 x 46 years of 7% growth
20 – $47,700 x 45 years of 7% growth
21 – $51,000 x 44 years of 7% growth
22 – $54,600 x 43 years of 7% growth
23 – $58,400 x 42 years of 7% growth
24 – $62,500 x 41 years of 7% growth
25 – $66,800 x 40 years of 7% growth
26 – $71,500 x 39 years of 7% growth
27 – $76,500 x 38 years of 7% growth
28 – $81,900 x 37 years of 7% growth
29 – $87,600 x 36 years of 7% growth
30 – $93,700 x 35 years of 7% growth
31 – $100,300 x 34 years of 7% growth
32 – $107,300 x 33 years of 7% growth
33 – $114,800 x 32 years of 7% growth
34 – $122,800 x 31 years of 7% growth
35 – $131,400 x 30 years of 7% growth
36 – $140,600 x 29 years of 7% growth
37 – $150,500 x 28 years of 7% growth
38 – $161,000 x 27 years of 7% growth
39 – $172,200 x 26 years of 7% growth
40 – $184,300 x 25 years of 7% growth
41 – $197,200 x 24 years of 7% growth
42 – $211,000 x 23 years of 7% growth
43 – $225,800 x 22 years of 7% growth
44 – $241,600 x 21 years of 7% growth
45 – $258,500 x 20 years of 7% growth
46 – $276,600 x 19 years of 7% growth
47 – $295,900 x 18 years of 7% growth
48 – $316,600 x 17 years of 7% growth
49 – $338,800 x 16 years of 7% growth
50 – $362,500 x 15 years of 7% growth
51 – $387,900 x 14 years of 7% growth
52 – $415,000 x 13 years of 7% growth
53 – $444,100 x 12 years of 7% growth
54 – $475,100 x 11 years of 7% growth
55 – $508,400 x 10 years of 7% growth
56 – $544,000 x 9 years of 7% growth
57 – $582,100 x 8 years of 7% growth
58 – $622,800 x 7 years of 7% growth
59 – $666,400 x 6 years of 7% growth
60 – $713,000 x 5 years of 7% growth
61 – $762,900 x 4 years of 7% growth
62 – $816,300 x 3 years of 7% growth
63 – $873,500 x 2 years of 7% growth
64 – $934,600 x 1 year of 7% growth
65 – $1,000,000

*****

Well, how’d you do? Don’t worry if you fell short. Remember, THIS IS IF YOU MAKE NO FURTHER CONTRIBUTIONS. You could be 35 with only $80,000, and you’d still hit $1M if you put in $4,000 every year until you’re 65. Also, $1M IS AN ARBITRARY NUMBER. Here’s why I’ll never need a $1M net worth. For more proof that $1M is arbitrary, consider inflation. If I have $1M when I’m 65, that’s only a buying power of today’s $480,610!

Whaddaya think? Does this make you want to become a millionaire more or less? Does this seem doable now? Are you now dreaming of yachts and underwear models? Let us know.

It’s not that difficult becoming rich. That’s why rich people are everywhere!

Financial Planning for Your Life Expectancy

screen-shot-2017-01-04-at-2-57-19-am

77. I’m going to die when I’m 77.

I was playing around with this life expectancy calculator and dutifully filled in my personal info, dreading the results. Would I die like my dad did, from heart complications at 55? Or would I flip Death the middle finger like my grandfather who passed away at 84? It was hard to tell. On one hand, I was reasonably healthy for a 28-year-old. On the other, I was a regular drinker and wasn’t as active as I could be. I was fully expecting my number to be below 65, making all my retirement planning silly and useless, but what I got was 77. Respectable, I thought. Now that I knew, it was time to start planning for it.

Using this compound interest calculator, I punched in my current investments and contribution rate: $17,245 to start, $3,000 a year, 37 years to grow (until I’m 65), and 7% interest. The results were heartening. Even though it’s fuzzy math, it estimated $725,479 when I’m 65. Not a bad little number. I wasn’t exactly a millionaire, but I didn’t need to be. I just needed enough to carry me through to my life expectancy. Here’s what I found.

Accounting for inflation – I used 2% – I was able to adjust my $725,479 to what it’d be worth in 2053, when I’m 65. I was shocked at what inflation ate up. My spending power was only about $348,673 in today’s dollars. Since that’s the more relevant number at this point, I’m using that to calculate my retirement plan. I want to know my spending power, not some wildly-inflated, future number. You can calculate your current dollars for inflation here.

My “$348,673”, at 7% interest, gets me “$24,407” a year while it’s invested, or “$2,033” a month. That’s about in line with my current spending. I spend just over $2,000/month now. If I play my finances this way when I’m 65, I could live off my nest egg FOREVER. But let’s say for a second the financial climate of 2053 is a riskier one, and I no longer want my money invested in US equity. If I cashed out EVERYTHING – like an idiot, but I digress – I could pace my “$348,673” out to “$29,056” a year, or “$2,421” a month until an expected death at 77. I am, somehow, covered both ways! Well, that’s a relief. By sheer luck alone, I don’t have to make any alterations at all to my retirement plan! Yay!

You have the tools now in the links I’ve given you above. You NEED to run your numbers and make a retirement plan that works for you. Ignoring this post could be the difference between literal life and death. Being broke at 80 is a far different story than being broke at 25.

On a happier note, with my finances taken care of, I can now shift the focus towards health and living a longer life. Let’s look at the life expectancy calculator again. I filled it in as follows: M, 28, 5’ 8”, 180 pounds, high blood pressure, quit smoking, 3-5 drinks a day, somewhat active. My life expectancy: 77. The best way of increasing my life expectancy is to bring my exercise level from “somewhat active” to “several times per week”. New life expectancy: 81. I can go even further by bringing my alcohol consumption from “3-5 drinks per day” to “2 drinks or less per day”. My life expectancy then becomes 82. Uhh… FUCK THAT. I like my beer. One extra year is not a fair trade. More beer now.

This might be an extreme method of measuring personal finance, but it’s still a useful exercise. It took me 10 minutes to come up with the numbers you see above. If a 10-minute time investment helps you make better financial and health decisions FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE, wouldn’t you take it? Tell us what you thought in the comments.

With that extra four years, maybe I’ll take up scuba diving…

The Super Boring Post on Normal Retirement

Screen Shot 2016-03-24 at 10.51.42 PM

Normal Retirement at 65 is basic personal finance, which is why it boggles my mind that Most People haven’t figured this shit out yet. Up until yesterday, I hadn’t figured it out either. After all, it wasn’t too long ago I said Retiring at any age wasn’t likely. The truth is I was just lazy and hadn’t run my numbers yet. I just got back from the bank, and I’m now 100% set for Normal Retirement (NR). Here’s how I did it.

I have $13,174.09 in my RRSP right now. $8,605.79 is invested in a Select Growth mutual fund and $4,568.30 is in US Index. I plan to go even more aggressive in my investment strategy and put 80% into US Index. I expect that to return 7% annually. I’m only 27, so I have 38 years of growth to look forward to before I’m an old sack of shit who won’t want to work anymore. If I do, I’ll have even more money, but let’s just pretend I’m useless at 65. Using our trusty Compound Interest Calculator, let’s see what happens if I maintain 7% growth for 38 years without further RRSP contributions: $172,307.50! Not bad, but I can’t Retire on that. What if I put in $100/month, or $1,200/year? Holy assballs, we’re looking at $393,875.85! THAT’S ONLY ADDING $100/MONTH! That’s enough to Retire on. I’ll still have my Home inflating my Net Worth to $500,000+ and I’ll most likely still be Working instead of being 100% Retired. I’ll be even richer! And all it took was $100/month. Go, me.

Are you in your 20s? Right now is the absolute most crucial time to save. Did you know investing just $15,000 from the time you’re 20-34 means more than investing $35,000 from the time you’re 30-64? WHAT THE FUCK. If, at 20, you start saving $100/month and invest it in US index funds with a 7% annual return, you’ll have $366,902.12 by 65! Are you an overachiever? $200/month gives you a whopping $733,804.23! HOW ARE YOU NOT ALREADY DOING THIS? ARE YOU NOT AWARE THAT BANKS ARE MONEY MACHINES DESIGNED TO MAKE YOU RICH?

If you’re reading this, you’re most likely a Millennial with no hope of Retiring. I’m here to tell you Retiring is possible. NR can be yours for less than $200/month. That’s approximately the cost of NOT buying a $5 latte every day. It’s also approximately the cost of NOT going to a club filled with douchebags and racking up a one-night bar tab every month.

Your Future is in your hands. What means more to you? The Retirement you never thought was possible, or the soy-mocha-frap-fuckdrink you “can’t live without”? Buy a coffeemaker. Go to shitty clubs less. Treat yourself still, but not in a way that costs money. Go for a goddamn jog. Eat well. Read a book. You’ll be Rich in no time.

If you need me, I’ll be over here mathing how to put an extra $100/month into my TFSA. Maybe I can try for EARLY Retirement. I can’t believe how simple Getting Rich is…