Your Entertainment Budget Should Be Less Than $1/Day

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The average American household spends $2,482/year on Entertainment and consists of 2.5 people. We can then reasonably estimate the average North American spends about $1,000/year on Entertainment by themselves. This is less than optimal. I’m about to show you how to get by on $1/day and be more entertained than ever. If you’re 30, your savings from this could amount to $93,925.05 extra in your retirement account by the time you’re 65. (Ask me for the math on our Facebook and I’ll happily show you.) Ready? Let’s kill your Entertainment bill.

First up, no more cable TV. TV subscribers are dwindling, and that seems to be driving prices up: “The average TV subscriber’s monthly bill ticked up from $65.25 in 2014 to $66.08 in 2015.” It’s just getting worse. Meanwhile, Netflix humbly asks for only $8-$12/month depending on your package and offers you immediate commercial-free access to “3 years, 202 days, 12 hours and 14 minutes” of Entertainment. Now, I get that you’re never gonna marathon Paw Patrol, but that’s fucking unreal. If you sleep for 8 hours and work for 8 hours on weekdays AND watch every waking minute you’re free including weekends, you’re looking at 8.3 YEARS of Entertainment for, like, $8/month. Meanwhile, I’ve spent hundreds building my paid iTunes library, but Spotify memberships range from full-of-ads “Free” to $10/month, and they both offer 30 MILLION SONGS. If each of those songs is just three minutes long, that’s 171 YEARS OF MUSIC! IF YOU STARTED LISTENING IN 1846, YOU’D BE DONE NOW. I really don’t understand how paying for individual songs is still a thing. Streaming services are obviously the future. (I like to think most of you know this already.)

Netflix and Spotify together? Even if you paid the individual maximum, that’s $22/month, or $264/year. Wanna get even spendier? Burn your money with a PlayStation Now membership for $100/year and stream 500+ PS3 and PS4 games. That adds up to $364/year, or just under $1/day. It’s almost like I planned it.

If reading’s more your jam, use your local library. You’re already paying for it in taxes, so use it. It warms my little nerd heart to know millennials are using their local libraries more than any other generation. Keep it up.

What I don’t advocate though is piracy. If you’re stealing something, you don’t deserve it. I place a lot of value on art – especially movies – so don’t do it.

Finally, MAKE your own entertainment! Some of you roll things like dining out into your Entertainment budgets, but cooking at home is better. While you’re at it, learn to draw, or play the guitar, or pick up a camera and take pictures of every stray cat in the neighbourhood. I know too many people who can tell me every plot point of Breaking Bad, but when I ask them for the last time they went swimming in the ocean or hiking up a mountain, they draw a blank!

The point is $1/day on Entertainment is already first-world luxury at its finest. Your ancestors didn’t have screens and they did a lot more than just stare into a fire. Realistically, with libraries and nature, your Entertainment budget could actually be ZERO, but $1/day for everything I described above seems like a fair trade. Just don’t spend an ABSOLUTELY INSANE $1,000/year on Entertainment like everyone else. This family can buy one person’s groceries for half a year on that.

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If You “Can’t Adult”, Stop Spending Like One

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Way back in 2000, I had an allowance of $5/day in early high school. I was supposed to buy lunch with it, but most of the time, I’d blow it all on a cup of overpriced coffee. Still, having no real savings to speak of and having no way to go into debt, I just kind of floated along in financial limbo. I only saw as far as my next cup of coffee, and The Bank of Mom & Dad ensured that would happen. My needs were looked after, and it’s not like I needed TWO cups of coffee in a day, so everything was good. For those few sweet years in high school, I didn’t need to worry about money. And you know what? I might want to return to that system as soon as next month.

No, I’m not going back to making daily withdrawals from The Bank of Mom & Dad. That’d be crazy talk. I’m frickin’ 28. No, what I’m doing is a sort of mental budgeting. Roommate “D” hit upon the idea recently when he withdrew a stack of $20s and made sure to only use one a day. Over a month, that’s only $600. If he wanted something that was $40, he’d have to go a day without spending anything. What he didn’t use could be carried over to the next day, and so on and so on. It was kinda brilliant. Going back to that allowance system made it so he never overstretched his budget, and when he ran out of money, he’d just stop. I NEEDED TO DO THAT TOO.

Obviously, this is nothing revolutionary. I was just happy to add one more tool to the financial toolkit. “D” reckons if he sticks to his allowance for June, his expenses should only be about $1,200 total, rent and all! Since I’m still having trouble getting below $1,500, this tool might be a godsend! I’m actually kind of excited for it because this restriction will force me to find low-cost, high-fun activities for entertainment, and that’ll help me for the rest of my life!

Can’t adult? Try going back to having an allowance. I know a lot of you are financially responsible enough that you don’t need this advice, but I also know some of you needed to hear this. Start with $20s for now, one a day, or adjust to your personal situation as needed. Maybe managing your money like a kid again is what you need to become a successful adult.