What Getting Fired Can Teach You About FIRE

A fired you isa lot like aFIRE'd you.

I got fired in 2013. There’s not much to say about it – it was the result of a work-inappropriate tweet – but I’ve made my peace with it because I learned so much. In a way, I was granted an accelerated look at what life would be like if I were retired. If you have your doubts, click that link. Two years of barely needing to work changed my outlook on wealth and retirement, and I was only 25 at the time. Even then, I knew FIRE wasn’t all sunshine and rainbows. If your FIRE number is your only goal, financial independence won’t make you happy. Only finding common ground between your values and priorities will. (Sorry for the hokeyness, but it’s true.)

Anyway, it’s 2018 now, and I found myself out of a job again. I wasn’t fired, but being pressured to leave due to an interpersonal conflict is almost worse. I’ve already lined up my next step, but there were a few weeks where I felt listless and unmotivated. After all, putting three years of hard work into a place meant more to me than money! It’s okay though; these things happen. In the end, it even turned into a great learning opportunity!

At first, I’d honestly settled back into my old ways. I ate out to numb the boredom, drank more, and racked up a dumb amount of screen time. This didn’t last long before I started feeling like crap. Suddenly, I remembered I’d written articles about quantifying happiness in one’s pursuits and purchases. It turned out I was just completely lacking in purpose. With no professional obligations for the time being (which was like being retired), I had nothing to do!

In one way, this was horrible. It meant I’d mismanaged my priorities to the point that I didn’t have any, but it also gave me the chance to tackle these problems before achieving FI. (For my numbers and strategy, read this and this. There’s a chance some level of FI could come sooner than I think.) I suddenly saw my retirement, and I didn’t like it. I needed purpose. It turns out I actually need work, at least for now. It’s a value of mine to be productive, so I had to prioritize it. This taught me I might never need full-on FIRE though! Maybe barista FIRE was the target now! More importantly, this also taught me I needed other, better goals. These are all good things to know before becoming financially independent. I’m just a workaholic. What can I do to become more?

I’m sure we’ve all, at some point, been less employed than we would’ve liked. I’m glad I got fired once or twice because it helped me learn how I act when I’m suddenly regifted an extra eight hours every day. If you found this post through recently getting fired, here’s my challenge to you: Note down how you feel, what your new motivations are, what you now prioritize, and how fast you start itching to work in some capacity again. After the honeymoon phase of FI when you travel the world for months or buy guinea pig armour just because you can, you often find that an FI’d you is still… you. A fired you is a lot like a FIRE’d you. What do you want when you don’t have to work? Some of us are too busy to find out. Answer that question honestly, and getting fired might be the best thing to ever happen to your retirement.

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Stop Stacking Luxuries

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Having worked in the retail world a while now, I’ve been run through every sales talk about add-ons and upselling there is. I’ve seen the numbers too. I can’t divulge mine, but consider that your popcorn and drinks “represent some 40 percent of theaters’ profits”, and adding a $9.26 beer to your $15 meal just bumped it up 62%. For those reasons alone, I’m super cautious about stacking my luxuries. I’ll show you what I mean.

I never buy popcorn. I went out for a nacho night with friends recently, split the bill and didn’t order any drinks, and my bill was somehow less than $4. At home, I even try not to snack during a Netflix movie. When buying clothes, I don’t accessorize. When I cook, I garnish as cheaply as I can — (none of my friends appreciate saffron anyway). And you know what? I ended up appreciating each individual luxury more. Here’s why.

When I bought popcorn, I’d annihilate most of it during the previews and endure a 2-hour movie trying to tongue the hard bits out of my teeth. The soda would destroy my fitness goals, and make me have to pee right before the climax of “Don’t Breathe”. The fact I paid for that inconvenience was especially questionable. Why would I pay for something that made me enjoy a luxury — the movie — less? This even happens when I crack a beer during Netflix. At my worst, I wouldn’t even remember how the movie ended a day after. Would I even enjoy the beer? Not really. I was distracted by the movie. With every luxury you stack, each individual luxury is diminished.

There are exceptions, of course. Some people argue wine complements great food, and I don’t disagree. I’ve just always had trouble tasting the finer notes of a 1999 Barolo while my mouth was full with a $25 Keg steak. A great accessory can complete an outfit. It can also cost $9,750 when your Indochino suit was only $579. When you try to cap off a basic luxury with something that makes it ‘more special’, that’s a green light to a salesperson that reads, “This person is here to be stupid with their money.” Your core goods are always cheaper, and upgrading them first is the only thing that makes sense. Even then, you can usually live without an upgrade. I’d rather watch four months of Netflix than spring for popcorn-and-a-movie for two. Heck, I won’t even make popcorn at home. Can you imagine crunching your way through “A Quiet Place”?

Do you stack your luxuries? Why or why not? Tell us in the comments.